75 years ago  

(1934)  

An article in a Tennessee paper told of the consignment of two young children by parcel post by their mother for a visit to their father. Mrs. C.H. Nelson of Conway recalled a similar incident here 18 years ago. On July 5, 1918, Donald, the little son of Mrs. Nelson and the late Rev. C.H. Nelson, who had been visiting his uncle, Mack See, in Conway, was "mailed" by him to his parents, who lived five miles west of Conway on a rural route served by D.F. Tucker. Fifty-two cents in stamps were attached to the boy. Mr. Tucker found a list "live" articles he was permitted to carry and saw he was permitted to carry day-old chicks and queen bees. However, he saw no prohibition against transporting a child as a mail matter, and little Donald was safely delivered to his parents’ mailbox. Mrs. Nelson still had the tag and stamps, which were attached to her son, together with newspapers clippings of the event. 

50 years ago 

(1959)

In a lovely candlelight ceremony at First Baptist Church, Miss Jo Ellen Wilbourn became the bride of Joe Thomas Ford. The Rev. James H. Street officiated. Music was provided by Dr. Milton Trusler and Miss Jeanie Packard. Bobby Ward and Jim Rogers lit the candles. The bride wore a gown of white peau de soie. The fitted bodice was of scalloped Alencon lace embroidered with iridescent sequins and pearls. Her bouffant skirt tapered to a chapel train. Her bridal veil was attached to a cap of lace incrusted with pearls and sequins. Her bouquet was a spiral of gardenias and stephanotis. Miss Beverly Wilbourn was maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Mrs. George Shaw Jr., Mrs. Charles W. Miller, Miss Mary Ann Faris and Miss Harriet Metts. Arch W. Ford served his son as best man. Ushers were Rayden Neely, Phillip Pascoe, Randy Wilbourn, Ora Lee Boss, Charles M. Miller and John Arnold. A reception followed the ceremony at the home of the bride’s parents, 631 Western Ave. For travel the bride chose a smart navy blue suit with navy accessories. 

25 years ago

(1984)

Hendrix College was among eight of the state’s 12 private colleges and universities increasing tuition. Hendrix tuition would be $1,300 for each term or $3,900 for the year, an increase of $100 a term. Tuition at Central Baptist College was $400 for each semester, among the lowest tuition of any private Arkansas college or university. The highest tuition for a private Arkansas college was $5,200 per year at John Brown University at Siloam Springs.

Jackie D. Taylor of Guy was appointed postmaster at Mayflower. He replaced Oleda Herron of Mayflower, who retired. 

10 years ago 

(1999)

Reeling from the loss of more than 1,000 jobs this past winter, Morrilton began its road to recovery with the announcement that ICT Group Inc. planned to open a bank and mortgage company customer-call center that would employ up to 350 people within a year. Jack Egan, ITC vice president said the company would eventually employ 620. The community of Morrilton had pulled together since the closing of two local plants: Arrow had employed almost 400 and Levi Strauss around 700. "What could have been a knockout to a lot of small communities became an opportunity," said Gov. Mike Huckabee. "What was an opportunity to put Morrilton on the mat became an opportunity to put Morrilton on the map."